What’s Getting in the Way of Project-Based Learning?

There are calls all over the place to move more opportunities to move around into the classroom. Kids need to move. They learn well if they can use their hands while they’re using their brains (and so… we give them stress balls instead of hand tools? Is this smart? But I digress).

My vision paper for my administrator certification was on a school model called Storied Learning, where students see themselves as the heroes at the centers of their own educational journeys. My next few posts will be excerpts from that paper.

One year, when my son had a significant gap in his schedule, I suggested he consider a course at the technical school just across the river. My wife, very much a forward thinker and a true success story of the educational approach of the 20th century, and my son both had the same kneejerk reaction: NO! Few people would argue against the practical side of Storied Learning, STEM labs, Project-Based Learning, ILOs, and so on. But what is it about our culture that is getting in the way of implementing experiential learning in our liberal arts educations?
In 1899, Thorstein Veblen published his work The Theory of the Leisure Class. In a nutshell, Veblen suggested that society has not evolved quite as far from our barbarian roots as we might like to believe. In barbarian cultures, the elite were warriors, religious figures, and political leaders. Thus, the elite had the time and the energy at the end of the day to party—to enjoy conspicuous consumption—a term coined by Veblen himself. Those who worked with their hands were inferior (e.g. women, smiths, farmers). The elite-acceptable jobs evolved, through the centuries, to include careers in certain businesses, law, medicine, and education. Those who work with their hands, and are thus physically involved in necessary industries, continue, Veblen argued, to maintain lower rungs on the social ladders.

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This student belonged to a team that made a windmill from scratch. By the time they finished, they were able to use it to power a light bulb. Their progress from the point this picture was taken up until the windmill lit that bulb was quite a story!

Hence, today, even though research shows a strong correlation between hands-on learning and retention, the resistance to grand scale implementation of it on the part of educators and government alike, is very likely to have its roots in class snobbery.

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